Archive for the 'all sciences' Category

College Algebra

Friday, July 25, 2008

By Richard A. Auffmann, Vernon C. Baker, and Richard D. Nation

Call Number: QA154.3 .C65 2005

This text provides a supportive environment to help students successfully learn the content of a standard algebra course. By incorporating interactive learning techniques, the Aufmann team helps students to better understand concepts, focus their studying habits, and obtain greater mathematical success.

            • Integrated Review Notes provided next to examples throughout the text help students see the key prerequisite skills used within the example. For added convenience, these example-specific notes direct students to the page(s) where they can practice and review the skills needed to understand the new concept, thus decreasing students’ frustration and increasing their success.
  • Prepare for the Next Section Exercises, found at the end of the exercise sets, have been carefully selected to review the prerequisite skills students will need in the next section. Next to each exercise is a reference to a section of the text where students can go to review topics they don’t understand. Answers to all of these exercises are provided in the Answer Appendix to help students better understand what they need to do to prepare for the next section.
  • Additional program components that support students with weak skills include,Eduspace tutorial practice, HM Mathspace Student CD-ROM tutorial practice, SMARTHINKING Live Online Tutoring, and Instructional DVDs and Videos.

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Biology for Nonbiologists

Friday, July 25, 2008

by Frank R. Spellman

Call Number: QH307.2 .S65 2007

The list keeps growing! The latest in Government Institutes’ non-specialist series, Biology for Non-biologists continues the tradition established by Toxicology for Non-Toxicologists and Chemistry for Non-chemists, by providing environmental and occupational-safety-and-health practitioners and students with a comprehensive overview of the principles and concepts of modern biology.

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Biotechnology: Changing Life Through Science

Thursday, July 24, 2008

by K. Lee Lerner & Brenda Wilmoth Lerner (editors)

Call Number: TP248.218 .B56 2007

Description no available

Deadly Companions: How Microbes Shaped Our History

Thursday, July 24, 2008

by Dorothy H. Crawford

Call Number: RA649 .C73 2007

Ever since we started huddling together in caves, the story of human history has been inextricably wed to the story of microbes. Bacteria and viruses have evolved and spread among us, shaping our society even as our changing human culture has shaped their evolutionary path.
Combining tales of devastating epidemics with accessible science and fascinating history, Deadly Companions reveals how closely microbes have evolved with us over the millennia, shaping human civilization through infection, disease, and deadly pandemic. Beginning with a dramatic account of the SARS pandemic at the start of the 21st century, Dorothy Crawford takes us back in time to follow the interlinked history of microbes and humanity, offering an up-to-date look at ancient plagues and epidemics, and identifying key changes in the way humans have lived–such as our move from hunter-gatherer to farmer to city-dweller–which made us ever more vulnerable to microbe attack.
Showing that how we live our lives today–with increased crowding and air travel–puts us once again at risk, Crawford asks whether we might ever conquer microbes completely, and whether we need a more microbe-centric view of the world. Among the possible answers, one thing becomes clear: that for generations to come, our deadly companions will continue to influence our lives. (Description by BarnesandNobles.com)

The Physics of NASCAR: How to Make Steel + Gas + Rubber = Speed

Tuesday, July 22, 2008

by Diandra Leslie-Pelecky

Call Number: TL236.28 .L47 2008

Every NASCAR fan – at one time or another – asks the same question: Why isn’t my favorite driver winning? This is your chance to discover how much more there is to NASCAR than “Go fast, turn left and don’t crash.” If you’ve ever wondered why racecars don’t have mufflers, how “bump drafting” works, or what in the world “Let’s go up a pound on the right rear and add half a round of wedge” means, The Physics of NASCAR is for you.

In this fast-paced investigation into the adrenaline-pumping world of NASCAR, a physicist with a passion uncovers what happens when the rubber hits the road and 800- horsepower vehicles compete at 190 miles per hour only inches from one another.

Diandra Leslie-Pelecky reveals how and why drivers trust the engineering and science their teams literally build around them not only to get them across the finish line in first place, but also to keep them alive. Professor Leslie-Pelecky is a physicist in love with the sport’s beauty and power and is uniquely qualified to explain exactly how physics translates into winning races.

Based on the author’s extensive access to race shops, pit crews, crew chiefs and mechanics, this book traces the life cycle of a race car from behind the scenes at top race shops to the track. The Physics of NASCAR takes readers right into the ultra competitive world of NASCAR, from the champion driver’s hot seat behind the detachable steering wheel to the New Zealander nicknamed Kiwi in charge of shocks for the No. 19 car.

Diandra Leslie-Pelecky tells her story in terms anyone who drives a car–and maybe occasionally looks under the hood–can understand. How do drivers walk away from serious crashes? How cantwo cars travel faster together than either car can on its own? How do you dress for a 1800°F gasoline fire? In simple yet detailed, high-octane prose, this is the ultimate thrill ride for armchair speed demons, auto science buffs, and NASCAR fans at every level of interest.

Readers, start your engines. (Description by BarnesandNobles.com)

Physics of the Impossible: A Scientific Exploration Into the World of Phasers, Force Fields, Teleportation, and Time Travel

Tuesday, July 22, 2008

by Michio Kaku

Call Number: QC75 .K18 2008

In this latest effort to popularize the sciences, City University of New York professor and media star Kaku (Hyperspace) ponders topics that many people regard as impossible, ranging from psychokinesis and telepathy to time travel and teleportation. His Class I impossibilities include force fields, telepathy and antiuniverses, which don’t violate the known laws of science and may become realities in the next century. Those in Class II await realization farther in the future and include faster-than-light travel and discovery of parallel universes. Kaku discusses only perpetual motion machines and precognition in Class III, things that aren’t possible according to our current understanding of science. He explains how what many consider to be flights of fancy are being made tangible by recent scientific discoveries ranging from rudimentary advances in teleportation to the creation of small quantities of antimatter and transmissions faster than the speed of light. Science and science fiction buffs can easily follow Kaku’s explanations as he shows that in the wonderful worlds of science, impossible things are happening every day. (Description by Publishers Weekly)

Native Alternatives to Invasive Plants

Monday, July 21, 2008

by C. Colston Burrell

Call Number SB439 .B877 2006

The biggest enemy of any garden is not a pest, disease, or poison—it’s any plant with tougher survival skills than the plants it competes with. The best way to weed out the invaders is with this fiendishly clever guide to native plants that can seek and destroy the top 100 most unwelcome perennials, grasses, vines, shrubs, and trees. While replacing the invaders, the beautiful, hardy native plants described here also attract native birds and butterflies, while turning away their own enemy invaders. Word-and-picture guides provide tips on care and maintenance, while helpful “at a glance” boxes depict shapes, sizes, best locations, and most attractive features of each native alternative. (Description by BarnesandNobles.com)