Archive for the 'culinary arts' Category

Food Jobs: 150 Great Jobs from the Quirky to the Sublime

Wednesday, December 3, 2008

foodBy Irena Chalmers

Do you want to turn your passion for food into a career? Take a bite out of the food world with help from the experts in this first-of-its-kind What Color Is Your Parachute? for food related careers.

Maybe you’re considering culinary school, maybe you’re about to graduate, or maybe you’re looking for an exciting career change. How can you translate your zest for flavor into a satisfying profession? Should you become a chef or open a specialty foods shop, write cookbooks or try your hand at food styling? Culinary careers are as varied as they are fascinating–the only challenge is deciding which one is right for you. Filled with advice from food-world pros including luminaries such as Alice Waters, Chris Kimball, Betty Fussell and Darra Goldstein, Food Jobs will set you behind the stove of your dream career.

In this tasty, nourishing book, food industry veteran Irena Chalmers offers profiles of food jobs by the dozen–everything from the traditional (maitre d’, caterer, dietician) to the behind-the-scenes (restaurant consultant, kitchen designer, hotel promoter) to the holy-cow-I-can-get-paid-for-that? (yacht chef, tea taster, fortune cookie message writer). Chalmers provides essential information for getting started and succeeding in your chosen culinary role including job descriptions, candid musings on what the job really entails and who it’s really for, and testimonials from the best in the field (Bobby Flay, Todd English, Gordon Hamersly, Francois Payard, Danny Meyer, Anthony Bourdain and more). The book also presents an array of resources on where to find more information to put you ahead of the competition. Bursting with real-life wisdom from those who’ve been there, FoodJobs will expose you to the myriad of different food jobs available and guide you to the one that’s right for you. Call Number TX911.3 .v62 c42 2008

Source Barnes&Noble.com

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Cooking Free: 200 Flavorful Recipes for People with Food Allergies and Multiple Food Sensitivities

Wednesday, December 3, 2008

cookingBy Carol Lee Fenster

Now you can enjoy your favorite recipes with creative alternatives to gluten, dairy, eggs, and sugar.

Does wheat sensitivity keep you from eating hearty breads? Or lactose intolerance mean the end of ice cream? Not anymore! Nutrition expert Carol Fenster has spent years developing recipes free of the food allergens that wreak havoc on your health, but full of the flavors you love.

Because so many of the 6 to 7 million Americans with food allergies have sensitivities to more than just one food, Fenster has created dishes that remove five of the most common allergens-gluten, dairy, eggs, and sugar-providing one book full of delicious recipes for you and your entire family, no matter what your individual dietary needs.

Complete with tips on cooking without traditional ingredients and conversion tables that will show you how to substitute alternative ingredients in your own recipes, this book can help keep you healthy while allowing you to indulge in delectable breads, entrées, and desserts. Call Number RC588 .D53 F46 2005

Source Barnes&Noble.com

The Bloodless Revolution: A Cultural History of Vegetarianism from 1600 to Modern Times

Thursday, July 24, 2008

by Tristram Stuart

Call Number: TX392 .S86 2007

Hailed by critics on both sides of the Atlantic, The Bloodless Revolution is a pioneering history of puritanical revolutionaries, European Hinduphiles, and visionary scientists who embraced radical ideas from the East and conspired to overthrow Western society’s voracious hunger for meat. At the heart of this compelling history are the stories of John Zephaniah Holwell, survivor of the Black Hole of Calcutta, and John Stewart and John Oswald, who traveled to India in the eighteenth century, converted to the animal-friendly tenets of Hinduism, and returned to Europe to spread the word. Leading figures of the Enlightenment—among them Rousseau, Voltaire, and Benjamin Franklin—gave intellectual backing to the vegetarians, sowing the seeds for everything from Victorian soup kitchens to contemporary animal rights and environmentalism.

Spanning across three centuries with reverberations to our current world, The Bloodless Revolution is a stunning debut from a young historian with enormous talent and promise, “draw[ing] the different strands of the subject together in a way that has never been done before” (Keith Thomas, author of Man and the Natural World). 24 pages of illustrations. (Description by BarnesandNobles.com)

Baking Illustrated

Thursday, July 24, 2008

by the editors of Cook’s Illustrated

Call Number: TX683 .B35 2004

With refreshing wit and patience for the home cook, the editors of Cook’s Illustrated magazine present their collective wisdom in an easy-to-use format. Whether readers are baking Brownies or Peanut Butter Cookies, or want to try the more advanced Crescent-Shaped Rugelach with Raisin-Walnut Filling or Fallen Chocolate Cake, or if they’re in the mood for something savory, such as Soft Pretzels or Buttermilk Biscuits, they’ll find everything (and possibly more) here. The criteria are stringent: a brownie “must not be so sweet as to make your teeth ache, and it must certainly have a thin, shiny, papery crust… offering a contrast with the brownie’s moist center.” Lengthy prologues explain the tests the editors conducted to arrive at each recipe, with humorous characterizations of what not to do (for example, readers learn to avoid the “lean, mean, whole-wheat-flour oatmeal scone”). The testers often start with professional chef recipes, tinkering as they go. Blueberry muffins get an overhaul in the “Blueberry Muffin Hall of Shame,” with mug shots of the guilty muffins’ characteristics (e.g., mashed, sticky surface, flat top). Even casual readers will appreciate the editors’ narrative flair and baking science (e.g., quiche gets cooled on a rack to prevent condensation), and there’s a refreshing absence of diet-conscious recipes here. With step-by-step illustrations on everything from how to remove bar cookies so they don’t crumble to chopping nuts, and a section on ingredients that goes as far as to recommend specific brands, this is an indispensable, comprehensive baking reference. (Apr.) Forecast: A $100,000 marketing campaign promises to get the word out on this essential tome. The editors will go on a 15-city tour, and the publisher will run ads in the New York Times. (Description by Publishers Weekly)

Arranging the Meal: A History of Table Service in France

Wednesday, July 23, 2008

by Jean-Louis Flandrin

Call Number: GT2853 .F7 F63

The sequence in which food has been served at meals has changed greatly over the centuries and has also varied from one country to another, a fact noted in virtually every culinary history. Most food writers have treated the more significant alterations as stand-alone events. The most famous example of such a change occurred in the nineteenth century, when service à la française–in which the stunning presentation made a great show but diners had to wait to be served–gave way to service à la russe, in which platters were passed among diners who served themselves. But in Arranging the Meal, the late culinary historian Jean-Louis Flandrin argues that such a change in the order of food service is far from a distinct event. Instead he regards it as a historical phenomenon, one that happened in response to socioeconomic and cultural factors–another mutation in an ever-changing sequence of customs. As France’s most illustrious culinary historian, Flandrin has become a cult figure in France, and this posthumous book is not only his final word but also a significant contribution to culinary scholarship. A foreword by Beatrice Fink places Flandrin’s work in context and offers a personal remembrance of this French culinary hero. (Description by BarnesandNobles.com)

Kitchen Literacy: How We Lost Knowledge of Where Food Comes from and Why We Need to Get It Back

Tuesday, July 22, 2008

by Ann Vileisis

Call Number: TX645 .V55 2008

As the distance between farm and table grew, we went from knowing particular places and specific stories behind our foods’ origins to instead relying on advertisers’ claims. The woman who raised, plucked, and cooked her own chicken knew its entire life history while today most of us have no idea whether hormones were fed to our poultry. Industrialized eating is undeniably convenient, but it has also created health and environmental problems, including food-borne pathogens, toxic pesticides, and pollution from factory farms.

Though the hidden costs of modern meals can be high, Vileisis shows that greater understanding can lead consumers to healthier and more sustainable choices. Revealing how knowledge of our food has been lost and how it might now be regained, Kitchen Literacy promises to make us think differently about what we eat. (Description by BarnesandNobles.com)

The African-American Heritage Cookbook: Traditional Recipes & Fond Remembrances from Alabama’s Renowned Tuskegee Institute

Tuesday, July 22, 2008

by Carolyn Quick Tillery

Call Number: TX715 .T568 2005

The fragrances, emotions, and tastes of the famous Tuskegee Institute, founded by former slave Booker T. Washington in 1881, are evoked in this collage of personal vignettes, pictorial accounts, poetry, and more than 200 traditional recipes. The history and entertaining information in these pages conjures the spirit of the small southern town of Tuskegee, Alabama, that for over 100 years has been a mecca and center of progress and education for African Americans. Not just a collection of recipes, The African-American Heritage Cookbook includes memories and literary passages intended to honor a notable American landmark. Beginning with the final days of slavery and extending through the Victorian period, the world wars, and the struggle for civil rights, this collection brings alive the pain and pride of suffering sharecroppers, the aspiring students of Washington’s fledgling school, and of the thousands of graduates who have gone forth to change America and the world. (Description by BarnesandNobles.com)

Making of a Chef: Mastering Heat at the Culinary Institute of America

Friday, July 18, 2008

By Michael Ruhlman

Call Number: TX649 .R8 A3

The eye-opening book that was nominated for a 1998 James Beard Foundation award in the Writing on Food category.

In the winter of 1996, Michael Ruhlman donned hounds-tooth-check pants and a chef’s jacket and entered the Culinary Institute of America in Hyde Park, New York, to learn the art of cooking. His vivid and energetic record of that experience, The Making of a Chef, takes us to the heart of this food-knowledge mecca. Here we meet a coterie of talented chefs, an astonishing and driven breed. Ruhlman learns fundamental skills and information about the behavior of food that make cooking anything possible. Ultimately, he propels himself and his readers through a score of kitchens and classrooms, from Asian and American regional cuisines to lunch cookery and even table waiting, in search of the elusive, unnameable elements of great cooking.

barnesandnoble.com

Leadership Lessons from a Chef: Finding Time to Be Great

Friday, July 18, 2008

By Charles Carroll

Call Number: TX911.3 .M27 C365 2008

A unique guide to leadership in the culinary arena, by a chef for chefs

Leadership Lessons from a Chef is about creating excellence in the professional kitchen. Here the difference between good and great comes down to the details, and attention to these details comes from the right attitude reaching across all staff. A good culinary manager, according to author and award-winning Certified Executive Chef Charles Carroll, skillfully cultivates this attitude for success, and so leads the way toward kitchen excellence.

Using stories and examples drawn from his many years’ experience, Chef Carroll gives you a leader’s tour through the working kitchen. Offering proven wisdom in plainspoken terms instead of abstract management theories, the practical tools and ideas found in this groundbreaking book can be used immediately to motivate and develop an effective team environment among kitchen staffs.

Leadership Lessons from a Chef features:

  • Chef Carroll’s formula for managing kitchen staffs SEF: Scheduling, Empowering, and Follow up and how the formula works in practice
  • Take-away boxes that reinforce key points
  • Chapters that progress logically, helping you evaluate and refine your goals, develop a mission and principles, and implement these in a motivational and positive way
  • Helpful forms for both greater efficiency and esprit de corps
  • Inspiring quotations, as well as life and work tips from Chef Carroll

Whether you’re a student just starting your culinary education, or an executive chef seeking to take your operation to a whole new level of excellence, Leadership Lessons from a Chef is an indispensable resource for all stages of your culinary career.

barnesandnoble.com

The Everything Guide to Starting and Running a Catering Business: Insider Advice on Turning Your Talent into a Lucrative Career

Friday, July 18, 2008

By Joyce Weinberg

Call Number: TX921 .W44 2007

Do you enjoy cooking for others? Is your buffet table a work of art? Are your parties the best in the neighborhood? Then catering may be a great career for you!

It’s all here-from getting licenses and choosing the perfect name to developing menus and getting the word out. Seasoned food expert and caterer Joyce Weinberg covers all aspects of the catering business and shares her secrets to success with you, including how to:

  • Choose a specialty-fancy fundraisers, company and family picnics, or romantic weddings
  • Find clients and generate repeat customers
  • Create a marketing plan that gets your company noticed by all the right people
  • Learn the ropes before you start your business
  • The Everything(r) Guide to Starting and Running a Catering Business is all you need to make your passion your profession!

    barnesandnoble.com