Archive for the 'graphic design' Category

Fresh Ideas in Letterhead and Business Card Design

Monday, September 15, 2008

By Martin and Mary Cooper

This fabulous collection of 120 letterhead systems and business cards is the most current available. And most of the pieces included here haven’t been published elsewhere, so look inside and you’ll find that you won’t be seeing repeats of cards and letterheads from design annuals and swipe files. (Description from barnesandnoble.com) Call number: NC1002 .L47 F74 1993

The Pixar Touch: The Making of a Company

Thursday, July 31, 2008

By David A. Price

Call Number: NC1766 .U52 P75 2008

The roller-coaster rags-to-riches story behind the phenomenal success of Pixar Animation Studios: the first in-depth look at the company that forever changed the film industry and the “fraternity of geeks” who shaped it.

The Pixar Touch
is a story of technical innovation that revolutionized animation, transforming hand-drawn cel animation to computer-generated 3-D graphics. It’s a triumphant business story of a company that began with a dream, remained true to the ideals of its founders—antibureaucratic and artist driven—and ended up a multibillion-dollar success.

We meet Pixar’s technical genius and founding CEO, Ed Catmull, who dreamed of becoming an animator, inspired by Disney’s Peter Pan and Pinocchio, realized he would never be good enough, and instead enrolled in the then new field of computer science at the University of Utah. It was Catmull who founded the computer graphics lab at the New York Institute of Technology and who wound up at Lucasfilm during the first Star Wars trilogy, running the computer graphics department, and found a patron in Steve Jobs, just ousted from Apple Computer, who bought Pixar for five million dollars. Catmull went on to win four Academy Awards for his technical feats and helped to create some of the key computer-generated imagery software that animators rely on today.

Price also writes about John Lasseter, who catapulted himself from unemployed animator to one of the most powerful figures in American filmmaking; animation was the only thing he ever wanted to do (he was inspired by Disney’s The Sword in the Stone), and Price’s book shows how Lasseter transformed computer animation from a novelty into an art form. The author writes as well about Steve Jobs, as volatile a figure as a Shakespearean monarch . . .

Based on interviews with dozens of insiders, The Pixar Touch examines the early wildcat years when computer animation was thought of as the lunatic fringe of the medium.

We see the studio at work today; how its writers, directors, and animators make their astonishing, and astonishingly popular, films.

The book also delves into Pixar’s corporate feuds: between Lasseter and his former champion, Jeffrey Katzenberg (A Bug’s Life vs. Antz), and between Jobs and Michael Eisner. And finally it explores Pixar’s complex relationship with the Walt Disney Company as it transformed itself from a Disney satellite into the $7.4 billion jewel in the Disney crown.

books-express.co.uk

Fresh Dialogue 8: Designing Audiences / New Voices in Graphic Design

Wednesday, July 30, 2008

By American Institute of Graphic Arts (editor)

Call Number: NC998.5 .A1 F74 2008

Each year, the New York Chapter of AIGA brings together emerging designers for Fresh Dialogue, a panel discussion that provides a forum to present and talk about work, thoughts, and ideas. Designing Audiences takes a fresh look at graphic design through the eyes of three young designers, all of whom have embraced a media landscape dominated by user-centric social networking sites such as MySpace, Flickr, and YouTube. Playing with the notion of designer as visual interlocutor, they craft conversations where viewers become participants and the relationship between design and its consumers is radically redefined.

This lively Fresh Dialogue volume includes designers from a variety of mediums: Stefan Bucher with his wildly popular Daily Monster series; Eric Rodenbeck with the Flickr mapping brainchild Mappr as well as in live data visualizations at Digg Labs; and Katie Salen with Karaoke Ice, the traveling karaoke ice cream truck. Designing Audiences is a stimulating and entertaining discussion of the changing role of the designer in the era of constant feedback. The moderator is popular online personality Ze Frank, creator of the-web based “the show with Ze Frank,” stand-up comic, and soon-to-go-Hollywood charmer.

amazon.com

Motion Blur 2: Multidimensional Moving Imagemakers

Friday, July 25, 2008

by onedotzero

Call Number: TR860 .M68 2007

onedotzero is a cross-media production company that runs an acclaimed international network of events. The onedotzero festival has become a global phenomenon, reaching over 60 cities worldwide and thousands of people. In Screen International‘s 25th anniversary issue, onedotzero was named as one of the top ten visionaries of the UK film industry alongside Ridley Scott and Lynne Ramsey.

With its pioneering vision, onedotzero champions new forms of moving image, and this book celebrates the next generation of creators who are accelerating the medium into the 21st century, following the success of the first Motion Blur. It features 27 international filmmakers who are exploring the evolving possibilities of motion graphics, broadcast design, digital film effects, and animation. Their work is illustrated by screen grabs, storyboards, and sketches, and the groundbreaking nature of their work is highlighted in exclusive interviews and short texts accompanying every production. (Desctiption by BarnesandNobles.com)

Game Design

Friday, July 25, 2008

by Bob Bates

Call Number: QA76.76 .C672 B38 2004

“Game Design, Second Edition” offers a behind-the-scenes look at how a game gets designed and developed?from the day the idea is born to the day the box hits the shelves. This new edition offers information on the latest techniques and development models, interviews with 12 top game designers, document templates that can be used during product development, and numerous industry resources. It is a practical guide that covers everything from the fundamentals of game design, to the trade-offs in the development process, to the deals a publisher makes to get a game on the shelves. No matter what your role in the industry, understanding this entire process will help you do your job better. And if you’re looking to break in, you’ll find knowledge here that is usually only attained after years in the trenches. (Description by BarnesandNobles.com)

Design Studies: Theory and Research in Graphic Design

Friday, July 25, 2008

by Audrey Bennett

Call Number: NC997 .D449 2006

In an age of globalization and connectivity, the idea of “mainstream culture” has become quaint. Websites, magazines, books, and television have all honed in on ever-diversifying subcultures, hoping to carve out niche audiences that grow savvier and more narrowly sliced by the day. Consequently, the discipline of graphic design has undergone a sea change. Where visual communication was once informed by a designer’s creative intuition, the proliferation of specialized audiences now calls for more research-based design processes.

Designers who ignore research run the risk of becoming mere tools for communication rather than bold voices. Design Studies, a collection of 27 essays from an international cast of top design researchers, sets out to mend this schism between research and practice. The texts presented here make a strong argument for performing rigorous experimentation and analysis. Each author outlines methods in which research has aided their design whether by investigating how senior citizens react to design aesthetics, how hip hop culture can influence design, or how design for Third World nations is affected by cultural differences. Contributors also outline inspired ways in which design educators can teach research methods to their students. Finally, Design Studies is rounded out by five annotated bibliographies to further aid designers in their research. This comprehensive reader is the definitive reference for this new direction in graphic design, and an essential resource for both students and practitioners. (Description by BarnesandNobles.com)

Graphic Design: A New History

Friday, July 25, 2008

by Steven J. Eskilson

Call Number: NC998 .E85 2007

This exciting new history of graphic design explores its evolution from the late 19th century to the present day. Organized chronologically, the book illuminates the dynamic relationship between design and manufacturing as well as the roles of technology, social change, and commercial forces on the course of design history. The layout of each chapter reflects the unique style of the period it describes, and some 450 illustrations throughout the volume provide a visual record of more than one hundred years of creative achievement in the field.

Under the influence of William Morris and the Arts and Crafts movement in the late 19th century, a new era began for design arts. Fueled by popular Art Nouveau advertising, the work of graphic designers became central in the growing consumer goods economy. This book traces the emergence of varied modernist design styles in the early 20th century and then examines the wartime politicization of regional styles through American government patronage and revolutionary Soviet ideas. Richly contextualized chapters chronicle the history of the Bauhaus and the rise of the International Style, followed by the postmodern movement of the 1970s and ’80s. After highlighting recent developments in graphic design around the globe, the author discusses the impact of inexpensive, powerful design software and the challenges facing designers now. (Description by BarnesandNobles.com)

Patterns: New Surface Design

Friday, July 25, 2008

By Drucilla Cole

Call Number: NK1510 .C65 2007

Pattern is back, and what better way to celebrate its revival than with a cool compendium of the best pattern design from around the globe? This exciting new book showcases some of the most innovative pattern designs, including graphics, textiles, fashion, furnishings, ceramics, tiles, wallpaper, and stationery. While many of the featured designers work commercially, others are independent players whose work is cutting-edge even though, or perhaps because, they don’t follow conventional techniques or disciplined structures. Figurative, funky, abstract, pixel-based, graphic, or retro patterns are all featured in this visual feast of the best work to emerge in the last five years.

barnesandnoble.com

Fresh Dialogue 2: New Voices in Graphic Design

Friday, July 25, 2008

By American Institute of Graphic Designers and Kevin Lyons

Call Number: NC998.5 .N72 N485 2001

Shopping for the freshest new design talent? You’ll find them here in Fresh Dialogue 2, the latest entree from the American Institute of Graphic Arts. Showcasing three exciting new voices—Warren Corbitt and Matt Owens from One9ine; Kevin Lyons; and Susan Parr from ReVerb—Fresh Dialogue 2 presents their design ideas and practices through discussion and vivid color images. One9ine is a design company specializing in visual communications for print, broadcast, and interactive media. Corbitt and Owens share a broad and in-depth knowledge ranging from editorial redesign to brand identity and website development. Their current client roster includes Wieden and Kennedy, MoMA, I.D., and Bartle Bogle and Hegarty. Kevin Lyons has worked for Urban Outfitters, Nike, Jordan Brand, Stussy, and the Spike Jones-owned Girl Skateboard Company. He was recently named one of the “top forty designers under 30” by I.D. Magazine. ReVerb is a design consultancy, research bureau, and trend-watching agency. Led by Somi Kim, Lisa Nugent, and Susan Parr, the 10-year-old company has evolved from an experimental design collective to a hybrid team that provides an integrated approach to the design, messaging, and execution of communications in diverse media.

barnesandnoble.com

New Typographic Design

Thursday, July 24, 2008

by Roger Fawcett-Tang

Call Number: Z246 F39 2007

As printing and design technologies have evolved over the past decade, so too have designers’ approaches to type design and typography. Today’s innovative designers have overturned established rules about type, turning letters into images and using typefaces in increasingly experimental ways. New Typographic Design covers a wide variety of applications from design for print–ranging from books, magazines, and brochures–to signage systems and screen-based typography, presenting the most current trends and directions of modern typography.
The book’s introduction discusses changing attitudes to innovation in typography through the 19th and 20th centuries, including the changing role of the designer, the question of legibility versus form, how type has become image, and the differing requirements for screen-based and print-based type. Four accompanying sections illustrate the key areas of typography today: type as form (how can existing type be handled in order to create an original design?), type as image (designs inspired by vernacular typography and noted for their hand-drawn aesthetic), type as experiment (the work of designers who push the boundaries of typographic recognition and legibility), and type in motion (how type can function in a three-dimensional or screen-based environment).
Authored by esteemed designer Roger Fawcett-Tang, this lavishly illustrated volume will provide a rich source of inspiration for both practicing designers and students.
Featured designers include:
Philippe Apeloig (France)
Ruedi Baur (France, Switzerland)
Oded Ezer (Israel)
Grandpeople (Norway)
Non-Format(England)
Sagmeister (U.S.A.)
Helmut Schmid (Germany)
Stiletto Design (U.S.A.)
Struktur Design (England)
3 Deep Design (Australia)

(Description by BarnesandNobles.com)