Archive for October, 2008

Olive’s Ocean

Friday, October 3, 2008

by Kevin Henkes

Call # Browsing Henkes

Synopsis

“Olive Barstow was dead. She’d been hit by a car on Monroe Street while riding her bicycle weeks ago. That was about all Martha knew.”

Martha Boyle and Olive Barstow could have been friends. But they weren’t — and now all that is left are eerie connections between two girls who were in the same grade at school and who both kept the same secret without knowing it.

Now Martha can’t stop thinking about Olive. A family summer on Cape Cod should help banish those thoughts; instead, they seep in everywhere.

And this year Martha’s routine at her beloved grandmother’s beachside house is complicated by the Manning boys. Jimmy, Tate, Todd, Luke, and Leo. But especially Jimmy. What if, what if, what if, what if?

The world can change in a minute.

Source Barnes And Noble.com

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The Color Purple

Friday, October 3, 2008

by Alice Walker

Call #Browsing Walker

Synopsis

Published to unprecedented acclaim, The Color Purple established Alice Walker as a major voice in modern fiction. Beautifully imagined and deeply compassionate, this is the story of two sisters-one a missionary in Africa and the other a child wife living in the South-who sustain their loyalty to and trust in each other across time, distance, and silence. This classic work of American literature is rich with passion, pain, inspiration, and an indomitable love of life.

Source Barnes&Noble.com

The Chocolate War

Friday, October 3, 2008

by Robert Cormier

Call #Browsing Cormier

Synopsis

Reissued now in hardcover with a new introduction by the author, Cormier’s chilling look at the insidious world of gang intimidation and the abuse of power in a boys’ boarding school is no less relevant today than it was in 1974.

Source Barnes&Noble.com

The Perks of Being a Wallflower

Friday, October 3, 2008

by Stephen Chbosky

Call # Browsing Chbosky

Synopsis

Standing on the fringes of life…

offers a unique perspective. But there comes a time to see what it looks like from the dance floor.

This haunting novel about the dilemma of passivity vs. passion marks the stunning debut of a provocative new voice in contemporary fiction: The Perks of Being a Wallflower.

This is the story of what it’s like to grow up in high school. More intimate than a diary, Charlie’s letters are singular and unique, hilarious and devastating. We may not know where he lives. We may not know to whom he is writing. All we know is the world he shares. Caught between trying to live his life and trying to run from it puts him on a strange course through uncharted territory. The world of first dates and mixed tapes, family dramas and new friends. The world of sex, drugs, and The Rocky Horror Picture Show, when all one requires is that perfect song on that perfect drive to feel infinite.

Through Charlie, Stephen Chbosky has created a deeply affecting coming-of-age story, a powerful novel that will spirit you back to those wild and poignant roller coaster days known as growing up.

Source Barnes&Noble.com

And Tango Makes Three

Friday, October 3, 2008

by Justin Richardson, Peter Parnell, Henry Cole (Illustrator)

Call # P210.3 R414 2005

Tango has two daddies in this heartwarming tale, inspired by actual events in New York’s Central Park Zoo. Two male penguins, Roy and Silo, “did everything together. They bowed to each other…. They sang to each other. And swam together. Wherever Roy went, Silo went too…. Their keeper… thought to himself, `They must be in love.’ ” Cole’s (The Sissy Duckling) endearing watercolors follow the twosome as they frolic affectionately in several vignettes and then try tirelessly to start a family-first they build a stone nest and then they comically attempt to hatch a rock. Their expressive eyes capture a range of moods within uncluttered, pastel-hued scenes dominated by pale blue. When the keeper discovers an egg that needs tending, he gives it to Roy and Silo, who hatch and raise the female. The keeper says, “We’ll call her Tango,… because it takes two to make a Tango.” Older readers will most appreciate the humor inherent in her name plus the larger theme of tolerance at work in this touching tale. Richardson and Parnell, making their children’s book debut, ease into the theme from the start, mentioning that “families of all kinds” visit the zoo. This tender story can also serve as a gentle jumping-off point for discussions about same-sex partnerships in human society.

Source Barnes&Noble.com